Choosing Glasses and Sunglasses

Choosing Glasses and Sunglasses

Sunglasses are vital for shielding teens’ eyes from harmful UV rays and for diminishing glare that can cause distractions or discomfort while playing.

Here are some tips that can help you choose the sunglasses that are right for teens:

  • Consider face shape and what type of sunglasses will look best.
  • Choose a pair that indicates UVA and UVB protection, usually indicated by a sticker or tag on the glasses.
  • Purchase sunglasses from a reputable retailer. These include department stores, big box stores, even drug and convenience stores. Online auction sites, flea markets or street vendors are not recommended because you do not know about the origin of the sunglasses.
  • If you are unsure of the level of protection the sunglasses offer, take them to your eye care provider’s office. They will be able to inspect the lenses to see what kind of protection, if any, the sunglasses provide.
  • Finally, protect teens’ sunglasses from damage, scratches, and loss by giving them a case and encouraging them to use it to store the glasses in the same place every day.

To learn more about how you can protect teens' eyes and vision from harmful UV rays, click here.

Several different types of sunglasses are available, depending on needs and individual preferences, including:

Prescription sunglasses feature lenses that correct your vision and match the prescription provided by the eye care provider. 

Non-prescription (plano) sunglasses are available at most retail outlets in a variety of styles, shapes, colors and price points to match every style and budget.

Larger frame sunglasses are an alternative to traditional sunglasses. Their increased size allows them to fit over prescription glasses. 

Flip-up and clip-on sunglasses fasten to the top of frames for quick coverage in bright light. For maximum comfort, frames should fit securely on the face and head when pushed back. Look for spring-loaded hinges, which help glasses keep their shape, and full side-to-side coverage to restrict peripheral light.

Photochromic sunglasses or polarized lenses that adapt to different brightness levels and maximize visibility in low light or foggy conditions. Yellow, red and gray tints decrease distortion, whereas copper-tinted shades heighten contrast.